Sunday, April 22, 2018

How to Build Your Story workshop, Saturday, Oct 20, in Waterloo


How to Build Your Story
Plotting novels & Writing short stories
Saturday, October 20, 2018
10 a.m. – 4 p.m.
Waterloo Regional Police Station, Community Room, 45 Columbia St E, Waterloo, Ontario (Map here)

This workshop will show you how writers plot a novel and will give you the best tips on writing short stories. We’ll also look at where to get your stories published and how to win contests. Best yet, you’ll see how to apply the story-building techniques you’ve learned to your own writing.

Guest speaker Hannah Mary McKinnon is the author of The Neighbors, a dark, suspenseful  woman’s fiction novel published in March 2018 by MIRA (HarperCollins USA) and Time After Time, published in June 2016 by AVON (HarperCollins UK), a novel about love, loss and second chances that’s full of humour. Hannah’s third book, Her Secret Son, was also acquired by MIRA and launches next spring.
When she’s not writing novels for adults, Hannah’s three boys give her plenty of material for children’s books. 
At the workshop, Hannah will be speaking about the different trial and error approaches she’s used to plot her novels and short stories. She’ll also be sharing her story of her writing career so far.
Visit Hannah’s website here.

Workshop leader Brian Henry has been a book editor and creative writing instructor for more than 25 years. He publishes Quick Brown Fox, Canada’s most popular blog for writers, teaches creative writing at Ryerson University, and has led workshops everywhere from Boston to Buffalo and from Sarnia to Charlottetown. But his proudest boast is that he has helped many of his students get their first book published and launch their careers as authors. 
See reviews of Brian's classes and workshops here.

Fee: 43.36 + 13% hst = 49 paid in advance by mail or Interac
or 46.90 + 13% hst = 53 if you wait to pay at the door
To reserve a spot now, email: brianhenry@sympatico.ca

See Brian’s complete current schedule hereincluding writing workshops, weekly writing classes, and weekend retreats in Algonquin Park, Bolton, Barrie, Brampton, Burlington, Caledon, Collingwood, Cambridge, Georgetown, Guelph, Hamilton, Kingston, Kitchener-Waterloo, London, Midland, Mississauga, Oakville, Ottawa, Peterborough, St. Catharines, Saint John, NB, Sudbury, Toronto, Windsor, Woodstock, Halton, Muskoka, Peel, Simcoe, York Region, the GTA, Ontario and beyond.

Saturday, April 21, 2018

Powerhouse literary agency Brandt & Hochman has eight literary agents – all open to new clients

The Portable Veblen by Elizabeth McKenzie,
represented by Brandt & Hochman
Brandt & Hochman Literary Agents, Inc.
1501 Broadway
Suite 2310
New York, NY 10036

Note: Don't ever miss a post on Quick Brown Fox. Fill in your email in the box to the right under my bio, and get each post delivered to your Inbox. ~ Brian

Brandt & Hochman Literary Agents is a powerhouse literary agency, which represents Scott Turow, Michael Cunningham, Julia Glass, Bob Shacochis, and Nancy Zafris, and many others. The agency has been around since 1913, and represents literary and commercial fiction, mystery/thriller, memoir, narrative nonfiction, journalism, history, current affairs, books on health, science, popular culture, lifestyle, and art history, plus middle grade and young adult fiction. Brandt & Hochman has eight literary agents – all of whom are open to new clients. Here are six a new writer might consider:

Not a Sound by Heather Gudenkauf,
one of Maianne's clients
Marianne Merola is a veteran literary agent. She co-ordinates a global network of foreign co-agents charged with licensing the work of the agency’s authors to a worldwide audience. She values strong and unique narrative voices and domestically represents bestselling and award-winning writers of compelling fiction, nonfiction and children’s books, specifically middle grade and young adult.
Query Marianne at: mmerola@bromasite.com


Bill Contardi For ten years Bill Contardi worked as an editor for NAL, Berkely, Popular Library, and Avon Books. He was director of literary affairs at United Artists and then vice-president, literary affairs at Warner Bros.—in their New York offices, charged with bringing in books for the studios to develop for feature film. For eleven years Bill was a dramatic rights agent for books to film and television at William Morris in New York.
Since 2002 he has been a literary agent with Brandt & Hochman Literary Agents representing authors and selling their work to publishers. In addition to building a list of new writers at Brandt & Hochman, Bill also continues to represent the dramatic rights of literary properties for some Brandt & Hochman clients and for a few other agencies as well.
His areas of interest are voice-driven young adult and middle grade fiction, commercial thrillers and general fiction, psychological suspense, spirituality and memoir. 
Query Bill at: bill@billcontardi.com

Emily Forland represents voice-driven literary fiction and nonfiction, among them bestsellers and prize winners, and has a special place in her heart for original writing that jumps off the page. Equally drawn to a traditional domestic novel as she is to more idiosyncratic work, she seeks out beautifully crafted writing, characters that come fully alive on the page, and stories rooted strongly in their setting. Humor is always welcome. In addition to literary fiction, she represents memoir, narrative nonfiction, history, biography, food writing, cultural criticism, graphic novels, and young adult fiction.
Query Emily at: eforland@bromasite.com

Emma Patterson was with the Wendy Weil Agency for eight years before joining Brandt & Hochman in 2013. She represents fiction ranging from dark, literary novels to historical and upmarket fiction; narrative non-fiction that includes memoir, investigative journalism, and popular history; and young adult fiction along similar lines.  She is drawn to both domestic and far-flung settings (while remaining on Earth) that are original and transporting.  She is looking for fresh, lyrical, and voice-driven writing, suspenseful plots, emotional narratives, and unforgettable characters. 
Query Emma at: epatterson@bromasite.com

Jody Kahn represents both literary and upmarket fiction, as well as narrative nonfiction; across all categories she enjoys books that are beautifully written while also containing a rich storyline, and she’s especially looking for deeply drawn characters and voice-driven narratives. Dark and edgy is always a plus. She’s also interested in untold stories and misunderstood populations.
In nonfiction, she’s seeking narrative related to sports, food, history, science, pop-culture, literary memoir and journalism. Above all, she wants to be gripped by what she’s reading, taken into a new and riveting world, one that touches her with its layers of complexity, and does not easily let go. 
Query Jody at: jkahn@bromasite.com

Henry Thayer represents non-fiction on a wide variety of subjects and fiction that inclines toward the literary. He is looking for new, engaging voices and compelling narratives. His wide-ranging interests include American history, popular music, and sports, among others.
Query Henry at: hthayer@bromasite.com

Full submission guidelines here.  

Brian Henry
If you’re interested in getting published, soon or somewhere down the road, don’t miss the How to Get Publishedworkshop with literary agent Paige Sisley, Saturday, August, 18, in Collingwood (see here).

And if you’re interested in Writing for Children or for Young Adults, Brian Henry will lead a mini-conference in Oakville with Yasemin Uçar, Senior Editor at Kids Can Press, and also a Kid Lit workshop in Sudbury sometime in the fall – details of these events still to come.  
For updated listings of Writing for Children & for Young adult workshops and for weekly Kid lit classes, see here (and scroll down).

Yasemin Uçar, senior editor,
Kids Can Press 
And don't miss: Writing With Style, Sunday, April 29, in Brampton (see here).  Writing Your Life on Saturday, May 5, in Burlington (see here), and Saturday, June 23, in Mississauga (see here) and Writing and Revising, Saturday, May 26, in Oakville (see here).
For the summer, Sign up for the Exploring Creative Writing course Wednesday, afternoons, July 4 – Aug 22, in Burlington (see here). Other weekly summer classes will be posted soon.

To reserve a spot in any workshop, retreat, or weekly course, email brianhenry@sympatico.ca

Read reviews of Brian’s courses and workshops here.

See Brian’s complete current schedule hereincluding writing workshops, weekly writing classes, and weekend retreats in Algonquin Park, Bolton, Barrie, Brampton, Burlington, Caledon, Collingwood, Cambridge, Georgetown, Guelph, Hamilton, Kingston, Kitchener-Waterloo, London, Midland, Mississauga, Oakville, Ottawa, Peterborough, St. Catharines, Saint John, NB, Sudbury, Toronto, Windsor, Woodstock, Halton, Muskoka, Peel, Simcoe, York Region, the GTA, Ontario and beyond.

Navigation tips: Always check out the labels underneath a post; they’ll lead you to various distinct collections of postings. Also, if you're searching for a literary agent who represents a particular type of book, check out this post.

Thursday, April 19, 2018

Exploring Creative Writing course, Wednesday afternoons, July 4 – Aug 22, in Burlington


Exploring Creative Writing
Eight weeks of discovering your creative side
Wednesday afternoons, 12:45 – 2:45
July 4 – August 22, 2018
Appleby United Church, 4407 Spruce Ave, Burlington, Ontario (Map here.)

This is your chance to take up writing in a warm, supportive environment. We’ll explore writing short stories and writing true stories, writing in first person and in third person, writing technique and getting creative, getting down your very best writing and just for fun writing.
The class has the same format as "Welcome to Creative Writing," but we look at different aspects of writing. With either course, you get a shot of inspiration every week and an assignment to keep you going till the next class. Best of all, this class will provide a zero-pressure, totally safe setting, where your words will grow and flower.

Instructor Brian Henry has been a book editor and creative writing instructor for more than 25 years. He publishes Quick Brown Fox, Canada's most popular blog for writers, teaches creative writing at Ryerson University and has led workshops everywhere from Boston to Buffalo and from Sarnia to Saint John. But his proudest boast is that he's helped many of his students get published.
Read reviews of Brian's introductory creative writing course here, and see other reviews here(and scroll down.)

Fee:  $167.26 plus 13% hst = 189
To reserve your spot, email: brianhenry@sympatico.ca

See Brian’’s complete current schedule hereincluding writing workshops, weekly writing classes, and weekend retreats in Algonquin Park, Bolton, Barrie, Brampton, Burlington, Caledon, Collingwood, Cambridge, Georgetown, Guelph, Hamilton, Kingston, Kitchener-Waterloo, London, Midland, Mississauga, Oakville, Ottawa, Peterborough, St. Catharines, Saint John, NB, Sudbury, Toronto, Windsor, Woodstock, Halton, Muskoka, Peel, Simcoe, York Region, the GTA, Ontario and beyond.

Wednesday, April 18, 2018

“The Visitor” by Lisa Sutcliffe



“Hey Bristlenut, taste this cake,” I said to my little brother Jim. He looked at me, unsure. The Australian sun had tanned his scrawny body a deep toffee, including his scalp under his trademark brush cut. “It tastes like chocolate,” I said, pretending to take a bite of the dirt mixture on my shovel.
He slowly took a small bite... ”It does!” he said with a muddy smile.  I almost felt bad for a moment. Then I noticed something by my foot at the edge of the driveway. “Hey, did you know that snails taste like candy?”
“No they don’t!”
“They do! People pay a lot of money for them in fancy restaurants.” 
As I reached for the snail, I glanced at the road and noticed a small cloud of dust in the distance, with a white spot in the centre, approaching fast. Clearly not a car. We lived in the last house before a small forest and a bridge to the more industrial part of Guildford, so there wasn’t much traffic on our end of the street. 
The dust cleared as the object thundered over the bridge. Suddenly it was in front of our house – a heaving monster with menacing crimson eyes and clumps of filthy wool flapping against its sides. Jim and I shrieked. The bulging eye fixed on mine and its raw animal terror shot through me.  In that heartbeat, it veered up the driveway toward us.
“Run!” I pushed my brother ahead of me to the backyard. “Mum! Help! Mum!”
My mother appeared on the back porch, annoyed and clearly about to tell us to stop fighting for probably the fourth time that day. When she saw what was chasing us, she picked up her whisk broom and hollered, “Get in the house!” 
Crouched behind the dubious safety of the screen door, my brother and I watched the battle in fear and amazement. Representing evil: the not-so-white sheep. Representing good: my barefoot mum, with her helmet of short black hair and thick cat-eye glasses. She wielded her broom with an expertise that would have made an Amazonian proud. She chased the sheep through the sandbox and around the almond tree. Stymied by fences at every turn, the sheep crashed into the side of the shed, sending the sweet pea vine flying off the trellis.  Thwack! went the broom against the sheep’s flank.  Thunk! went the sheep’s head as it caught the edge of the rickety outhouse. 
“Get out! Get out!” commanded Mum in that tone that we all knew and feared, sweeping the beast back to the driveway.
My brother and I raced through the house to the living room window.  The sheep careened down the driveway, made a wide left turn onto the road and bolted off the way it had come. Back toward the abattoir at the other side of the bridge.


Lisa Sutcliffe is an Oakville, Ontario resident in the honeymoon stage of retirement. She is rediscovering the joy of writing something other than proposals and corporate documents, thanks to the inspirational environment of Brian Henry’s classes.

See Brian Henry’s schedule hereincluding writing workshops, weekly writing classes, and weekend retreats in Algonquin Park, Bolton, Barrie, Brampton, Burlington, Caledon, Collingwood, Cambridge, Georgetown, Guelph, Hamilton, Kingston, Kitchener-Waterloo, London, Midland, Mississauga, Oakville, Ottawa, Peterborough, St. Catharines, Saint John, NB, Sudbury, Toronto, Windsor, Woodstock, Halton, Muskoka, Peel, Simcoe, York Region, the GTA, Ontario and beyond.

Tuesday, April 17, 2018

Writing with Style workshop, Sunday, April 29, in Brampton

Writing With Style
Sunday, April 29, 2018
1:30 – 4:30 p.m.
Cyril Clark Branch, Brampton Library
20 Loafer’s Lake Lane, Brampton, Ontario (Map 
here)

If you do any kind of creative writing, fiction or nonfiction, this workshop is for you. We’ll tackle the nitty-gritty of putting words on paper in a way that will grip the reader’s imagination. You'll learn how to avoid common errors that drain the life from your prose. And you'll discover how to make your writing more vivid, more elegant and more powerful.

Workshop leader Brian Henry has been a book editor and creative writing instructor for more than 25 years. He publishes Quick Brown Fox, Canada’s most popular blog for writers, teaches creative writing at Ryerson University and has led workshops everywhere from Boston to Buffalo and from Sarnia to Saint John. But his proudest boast is that he has helped many of his students get published.

Fee: 37.17 + hst = 42 paid in advance or 39.82 + hst = 45 if you wait to pay at the door
To reserve a spot now, email: brianhenry@sympatico.ca

See Brian’s full schedule here, including writing workshops and creative writing courses in Algonquin Park, Bolton, Barrie, Brampton, Burlington, Caledon, Georgetown, Guelph, Hamilton, Ingersoll, Kingston, Kitchener, London, Midland, Mississauga, Newmarket, Orillia, Oakville, Ottawa, Peterborough, St. Catharines, St. John, NB, Sudbury, Thessalon, Toronto, Windsor, Halton, Ingersoll, Kitchener-Waterloo, Muskoka, Peel, Simcoe, York, the GTA, Ontario and beyond.

Monday, April 16, 2018

Paying markets for literary fiction and science fiction, literary poetry and speculative poetry, and creative nonfiction


Arc Poetry Magazine this venerable Canadian poetry magazine seeks poetry. (What else?) Pays $50 per page for poetry.

Deadline: May 31, 2018. Guidelines here.

Pedestal Magazine seeks  speculative poetry for the June 2018 issue (Pedestal 82). Speculative includes science fiction, fantasy, supernatural horror, science, surrealism, and experimental.  Pays $40 for each poem accepted. 
Deadline: May 27, 2018. Guidelines here.


The Kweli Journal celebrates community and cultural kinships and lived experience of people of color: “Our many stories. Our shared histories. Our creative play with language. Here our memories are wrapped inside the music of the Muscogee, the blues songs of the South, the clipped patois of the Caribbean." Publishes one print issue and two online issues each year. Seeks self-contained novel excerpts, short stories, creative nonfiction, and poetry.  Submissions should be no more than 6,000 words. Pays upon publication.
Deadline: May 30, 2018. Guidelines here.

Things in the Well is an Australian-based publisher of horror and science fiction. They’re seeking submissions for Beyond the Infinite - Tales from the Outer Reaches, a call dark science fiction anthology:
I want stories that are outstanding, different and memorable!  outstanding, different, and memorable! I want something new and exciting! New psychological terrors involving time travel; primal fears triggered by something new that threatens humanity, and new hopes that we may conquer them; new creatures that will make people want to go out and buy the Halloween mask; and new stories of the weird in the outer-reaches of time and space.
“If you need more ideas, take a look outside the typical Sci-Fi genre... Read Clive Barker’s short story ‘The Skins of the Fathers’ or HPL’s ‘The Colour out of space,’ or go back further and look wider to William Hope Hodgson’s ‘The House on the Borderland,’ or Brian Lumley’s ‘The House of Doors’ and ‘Necroscope’ series.
“So, something memorable, dark, and/or something that offers hope and/or despair for humanity… I envision the SciFi element as merely the stage for the story to unfold, cracking our world(s) open to reveal a truer story beyond the genre’s superfice. Gee, that sounds pompous, but you get my (space) drift. I anticipate a (star)fleet of top-notch submissions as usual, so I'm aftememorable stories, a sense of dread, and some level of believability and internal consistency would be more important than a lengthy treatise or a quick shudder.
Pays $50 AUD for a story, plus a copy of the book in paperback form.  
Deadline: "End of May." Guidelines here.

The Baltimore Review is on online quarterly and also publishes a print issue once a year. Seeks fiction (3,000 words max), poetry (1–3 poems), and creative nonfiction (5,000 words max). Also accepts video submissions and “none of the above” submissions. Pays $40 per piece.
The Baltimore Review is also seeking contest submissions. Theme: Clothes. 5,000-word maximum for fiction and creative nonfiction; 3 poems maximum. Fee: $10. Prizes: $500, $300 and $100.
Deadline: May 31, 2018. Guidelines here and here.

One Story sends one short story of 3,000 to 8,000 words to its subscribers each month. Stories can be any style and on any subject as long as they are good. “We are looking for stories that leave readers feeling satisfied and are strong enough to stand alone. Pays $500, plus 25 copies.
Deadline: May 31, 2018. Guidelines here.

Note: Don't ever miss a post on Quick Brown Fox. Fill in the "Follow Brian by Email" box to the right under my bio and get each post delivered to your Inbox. Also, you can hang out and chat with Quick Brown Foxes (and vixens) on Facebook. Just send a Friend request to Brian Henry. Finally, if you’re not yet on my newsletter, send me an email, including your locale, to  brianhenry@sympatico.ca ~Brian


See Brian Henry’s schedule hereincluding writing workshops, weekly writing classes, and weekend retreats in Algonquin Park, Bolton, Barrie, Brampton, Burlington, Caledon, Collingwood, Cambridge, Georgetown, Guelph, Hamilton, Kingston, Kitchener-Waterloo, London, Midland, Mississauga, Oakville, Ottawa, Peterborough, St. Catharines, Saint John, NB, Sudbury, Toronto, Windsor, Woodstock, Halton, Muskoka, Peel, Simcoe, York Region, the GTA, Ontario and beyond.