Thursday, December 14, 2017

32 Canadian literary journals that pay

Note: Don't ever miss a post on Quick Brown Fox. Fill in the "Follow Brian by Email" box to the right under my bio and get each post delivered to your Inbox. 
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Finally, if you’re not yet on my newsletter, send me an email, including your locale, to brianhenry@sympatico.ca ~Brian

The Antigonish Review
Accepts: Fiction, nonfiction, poetry, reviews
Issues per year: 4
Submission period: Year round
Payment: $50 plus two copies


Arc Poetry Magazine
Accepts: Poetry
Issues per year: 3
Submission period: Fall
Payment: $50 per page, one copy of the issue

Canadian Literature
Accepts: Poetry, reviews
Issues per year: 4
Submission period: Year round
Payment: Honorarium for poetry

Canthius
Accepts: Fiction, nonfiction, poetry
Issues per year: 2
Submission period: Year round
Payment: $5 per page, one copy of the issue

Accepts: Poetry
Issues per year: 3
Submission period: See dates
Payment: $50 per published page to a maximum of $150

The Carousel
Accepts: Fiction, poetry
Issues per year: 2
Submission Period: January and September (
see dates)
Payment: $55 for 1-4 pages, $100 for five or more pages, a two-issue subscription which includes the copy with the submitted work

Carte Blanche
Accepts: Fiction, nonfiction, poetry
Issues per year: 3
Submission period: Spring and Fall
Payment: Honorarium per submission

The Claremont Review
Accepts: Poetry, fiction, visual art
Issues per year: 2
Submission period: Fall
Payment: $10 per page


Contemporary Verse 2: The Canadian Journal of Poetry and Critical Writing (CV2)
Accepts: Poetry, nonfiction, interviews, reviews
Issues per year: 4
Submission period: Sept. 1 through May 31
Payment: $30 per poem, $50-$100 for interviews and articles, $40-$150 for essays, $40-$80 for reviews, two copies of the issue

Event
Accepts: Fiction, poetry, nonfiction
Issues per year: 3
Submission period: Year round
Payment: $25 per page ($30 for poetry), up to $500


Exile
Accepts: Fiction, nonfiction, poetry, translation, drama, visual art
Issues per year: 4
Submission period: Year round
Payment: 5¢ per word, one copy of the issue


Existere
Accepts: Fiction, nonfiction, poetry, reviews, visual art
Issues per year: 2
Submission period: Year round
Payment: Honorarium, one copy of the issue

The Feathertale Review
Accepts: Fiction, poetry, cartoons
Issue per year: 2
Submission period: Year round
Payment: Payment if submission is published in print

The Fiddlehead
Accepts: Fiction, poetry
Issues per year: 4
Submission period: Year round
Payment: $60 per published page, two copies of the issue

filling station
Accepts: Fiction, nonfiction, poetry, visual art
Issues per year: 3
Submission period: Year round
Payment: $25 honorarium, complimentary 3-issue subscription, discount on future renewals and subscriptions

Freefall Magazine
Accepts: Fiction, nonfiction, poetry, book reviews, art
Issues per year: 3
Submission period: 
See dates
Payment: $10 per page to a maximum of $100, one copy of the issue


For weekly creative writing classes, one-day workshops, and the Algonquin writing retreat, see here.

Grain
Accepts: Fiction, literary nonfiction, poetry
Issues per year: 4
Submission period: Sept. 1 to May 31
Payment: $50 per page to a maximum of $250, two copies of the issue

Hamilton Arts & Letters
Accepts: Fiction, nonfiction, poetry, reviews
Issues per year: 2
Submission period: Spring and fall
Payment: Honorarium

Humber Literary Review
Accepts: Fiction, personal essays, poetry, visual art
Issues per year: 2
Submission period: 
See dates
Payment: $100, two copies of the issue


The Impressment Gang
Accepts: Fiction, nonfiction, poetry, reviews
Issues per year: 3
Submission period: 
See dates
Payment: $25, two copies of the issue


The Malahat Review
Accepts: Fiction, nonfiction, poetry
Issues per year: 4
Submission period: Year round
Payment: $60 per published page, one-year subscription

The New Quarterly
Accepts: Fiction, nonfiction, poetry
Issues per year: 4
Submission period: Year round
Payment: $250 for fiction and nonfiction, $40 for poetry

On Spec
Accepts: Fiction, poetry
Issues per year: 4
Submission period: 
See dates
Payment: Yes

Plenitude
Accepts: Fiction, nonfiction, poetry, reviews, interviews
Issues per year: Online only
Submission Period: Year round
Payment: $60 for prose, $25 for poetry

Accepts: Fiction, nonfiction, poetry
Issues per year: 4
Submission period: Year round
Payment: 10¢ per word for prose to various maximums, $40 for poetry

Prairie Journal of Canadian Literature
Accepts: Fiction, poetry, drama, literary criticism
Issues per year: 2
Submission period: Year round
Payment: Honorarium if submission is published in print

Prism International
Accepts: Fiction, nonfiction, poetry, drama
Issues per year: 4
Submission period: Year round
Payment: $30 per printed page for prose, two copies of the issue

The Puritan
Accepts: Fiction, poetry, essays
Issues per year: 4
Submission period: Year round
Payment: $100

Room
Accepts: Fiction, nonfiction, poetry, visual art from women. Men not welcome
Issues per year: 4
Submission period: Year round
Payment: $50 for one page, $60 for two pages, $90 for three pages, $120 for four pages, $150 for five or more pages

subTerrain
Accepts: Fiction, nonfiction, poetry
Issues per year: 3
Submission period: Year round
Payment: $50 per page, $50 per poem

Understorey Magazine
Accepts: Fiction, nonfiction, poetry
Issues per year: 2-3
Submission period: Year round
Payment: $30-$60 honorarium


Vallum
Accepts: Poetry, essays, reviews
Issues per year: 2
Submission Period: Year round
Payment: Yes


See Brian Henry’s schedule here, including writing workshops and creative writing courses in Algonquin Park, Bolton, Barrie, Brampton, Burlington, Caledon, Georgetown, Guelph, Hamilton, Kingston, Kitchener, London, Midland, Mississauga, Newmarket, Oakville, Ottawa, Peterborough, St. Catharines, St. John, NB, Sudbury, Thessalon, Toronto, Windsor, Woodstock, Halton, Kitchener-Waterloo, Muskoka, Peel, Simcoe, York Region, the GTA, Ontario and beyond.

Wednesday, December 13, 2017

Critiquing Seminar for the Cambridge Writers Collective, Sunday, January 21


Critiquing Seminar
Sunday, January 21, 2018
1:30 – 4:00 p.m.
 Donaldson Room at the Cambridge Center for the Arts
60 Dickson St, Cambridge, Ontario (Map here.)

Note: This seminar is open only to members of the Cambridge Writers' Collective. For more about the Cambridge Writers Collective see here and visit their Facebook page here. For information about joining the group, email: cambridge_writers@yahoo.ca


Beyond the writing itself, what’s most important for a writer – whether just starting or experienced – is a good critique group or writing buddies. But the emphasis falls on having a good group – and that’s hard to create. This seminar covers the whole gamut of issues, from making sure everyone has opportunities to bring in substantial chunks of their work to making sure the process stays positive and fulfilling. Among other issues we’ll look at:
-          Organizing and scheduling – it doesn’t happen by itself
-          How to give effective and helpful critiques – sensitivity, professionalism, and creativity
-          Critiquing other people’s work – first pass, second, and third
-          How to hear a critique – not all advice is good advice

Participants are invited to bring a short sample of your work: 1,000 words absolute maximum, but 750 words or less works better. Bring three copies.

Seminar leader Brian Henry has been a book editor and creative writing instructor for more than 25 years. He publishes Quick Brown Fox, Canada's most popular blog for writers, teaches creative writing at Ryerson University and has led workshops everywhere from Boston to Buffalo and from Sarnia to Saint John. In addition to one-day workshops, he teaches half a dozen or more weekly classes each week, including a few advanced, guided critique groups. But his proudest boast is that he’s has helped many of his students get published.
Read reviews of Brian's classes, workshops and writing retreats here (and scroll down).

See Brian’s complete current schedule here, including writing workshops and creative writing courses in Algonquin Park, Bolton, Barrie, Brampton, Burlington, Caledon, Georgetown, Guelph, Hamilton, Kingston, Kitchener, London, Midland, Mississauga, Newmarket, Oakville, Ottawa, Peterborough, St. Catharines, St. John, NB, Sudbury, Thessalon, Toronto, Windsor, Woodstock, Halton, Kitchener-Waterloo, Muskoka, Peel, Simcoe, York Region, the GTA, Ontario and beyond.

Tuesday, December 12, 2017

Happy Hanukkah

Kids lighting a Hanukkiah in Jerusalem



First night of Hanukkah in Jerusalem

Note: The photo and video are from “8 Special ways to celebrate Hanukkah 2016 in Israel” by Viva Sarah Press. Read the article here.


Writing Personal Stories course and Introductory Creative Writing course (offered in two locales) starting in the new year

Writing Personal Stories
8 weeks of sharing and writing
Thursday afternoons, 12:45 – 2:45 p.m.
January 25 – March 15, 2018
Appleby United Church, 4407 Spruce Ave, Burlington, Ontario (Map here.)

If you've ever considered writing your personal stories, this course is for you. We’ll look at memoirs, travel writing, personal essays, family history ~ personal stories of all kinds. Plus, of course, we’ll work on creativity and writing technique and have fun doing it. 
Whether you want to write a book or just get your thoughts down on paper, this weekly course will get you going. We'll reveal the tricks and conventions of telling true stories, and we’ll show you how to use the techniques of the novel to recount actual events. Weekly writing exercises and friendly feedback from the instructor will help you move forward on this writing adventure. Whether you want to write for your family and friends or for a wider public, don't miss this course.
Read reviews of the Writing Personal Stories course here.

Fee:  $159.29 plus 13% hst = $180
To reserve your spot, email: brianhenry@sympatico.ca

Exploring Creative Writing
9 weeks discovering your creative side
Offered at two locales:
Thursday mornings, 9:45 – 11:45 a.m.
January 25 – March 29, 2018 (no class March 15)
Woodside Branch of the Oakville Public Library
1274 Rebecca St, Oakville, Ontario (Map here)
And
Friday afternoons, 1:30 – 3:30 p.m.
February 2 – March 23, 2018
Glenview Church , Bethlehem Room, 1 Glenview Ave, Toronto, Ontario (Map here)
See all seven courses starting in the new year here.

This is your chance to take up writing in a warm, supportive environment. We’ll explore writing short stories and writing true stories, writing in first person and in third person, writing technique and getting creative, getting down your very best writing and just for fun writing.
The class has the same format as "Welcome to Creative Writing," but we look at different aspects of writing. With either course, you get a shot of inspiration every week and an assignment to keep you going till the next class. Best of all, this class will provide a zero-pressure, totally safe setting, where your words will grow and flower.
Read reviews of Brian's introductory creative writing course here, and see other reviews here (and scroll down.)

Fee: 176.11 + hst = 199
To reserve your spot, email: brianhenry@sympatico.ca

Instructor Brian Henry has been a book editor and creative writing instructor for more than 25 years. He publishes Quick Brown Fox, Canada’s most popular blog for writers, teaches creative writing at Ryerson University and has led workshops everywhere from Boston to Buffalo and from Sarnia to Saint John. But his proudest boast is that he has helped many of his students get their first book published and launch their careers as authors. 


See Brian’s complete current schedule hereincluding writing workshops and creative writing courses in Algonquin Park, Bolton, Barrie, Brampton, Burlington, Caledon, Georgetown, Guelph, Hamilton, Ingersoll, Kingston, Kitchener, London, Midland, Mississauga, Oakville, Ottawa, Peterborough, St. Catharines, Saint John, NB, Sudbury, Thessalon, Toronto, Windsor, Woodstock, Halton, Kitchener-Waterloo, Muskoka, Peel, Simcoe, York Region, the GTA, Ontario and beyond.

Monday, December 11, 2017

“Where Did You Get To?” by Debra P. McGill


Merciless in the cloudless sky, the noon sun beat down on the city below. The heat and humidity magnified the smells, the aromas of cumin and curry and garam masala mingled with the odor of dung, freshly deposited close by one of the market place stalls. What had earlier in the day been a sensual delight, had become an olfactory assault.

People were milling about, no particular order to their movements as they made their way through the market. Some standing, some walking, suddenly stopping, talking, hands gesturing or fingering fabrics of silk organza or khadi cotton, scarlet red, saffron yellow, tangerine orange, sapphire blue, hemmed with threads of gold that glittered in the blinding sunlight.

Frank was tall, over six feet and easily able to see over the heads of the many shoppers. He and Jeanine had been here for almost a month now and he had come to love the vantage point that his height brought him.

But at that moment, his face was strained as he anxiously looked through the crowd, searching for his wife. She was petite, but her blonde hair should be easy enough to spot among the heads of ebony hair accented by colourful headscarves.

The longer she was out of his sight, the more worried Frank became, the pit of his stomach rolled in waves of anxiety. Not knowing where to begin to look or who he might ask, Frank’s gaze kept returning to the same few places they had been to earlier: the textile vendor’s stall where Jeanine lovingly ran her hand over the hand painted silk organza fabric; the “sweets” stall where the vendor had enticed Jeanine to sample one of her saccharine sweet gulab jamun balls; the jeweler’s stall where Jeanine stood silent, staring at chains of braided gold hanging from a wooden frame, trays heaped with bangles and bracelets and earrings. 

Frank had smiled, watching Jeanine’s finger trace the intricate designs on the earrings, the bracelets, inlays of cyan blue or sea green mother of pearl. 

Frank’s eyes moved from one stall to another to another. The street noise was beginning to wear on him. The endless ringing of bicycle bells, two stroke engines sputtering and revving, the non-stop sing-song voices of the vendors, rising ever louder above the din. 

Frank used the flat of his hand to wipe the perspiration that trickled down the side of his face. His eyes were beginning to burn as sweat found its way between his lashes. The indentation of his spine became a channel for the sweat as it ran down his back. 

She had been standing behind him as he talked with the spice vendor. He had turned his back to her for only a moment, long enough to admire the granite mortar and pestle that the vendor held out to him. Mottled black and gold granite, cool to the touch but heavy in his hand.

The vendor measured out seeds into his palm, then dropped them into the mortar bowl. Lightly pressing the seed with the pestle, he showed Frank how to grind the seed into a fine powder.

Frank had lifted the bowl to his nostrils and breathed in the aroma. lingering for a moment as he gently inhaled its sensuous odor, finding it strangely soothing, calming.  He’d turned to offer Jeanine the bowl, to share with her the aromatic delight that was freshly ground cuminum. But she wasn’t there. She was gone. Disappeared!

Frank looked at his watch, but he had no sense of how much time had passed.  The sun still beat down, the heat and humidity of the day pressed even closer, his shirt clinging to him.

Slowly, deliberately, Frank began a three hundred and sixty degree turn; hands in fists at his side, his sandaled feet moving mere inches at a time, eyes scanning the market, taking in every stall, every vendor, every curtained doorway.  Where was she?

Frank was about two hundred degrees into his full circle turn when he caught a shimmer as a ray of sun reflecting off gold. Not the gold of bangles or bracelets or chains, but the shine of golden yellow hair, the hair on the petite figure that was his wife.



Tremors of relief ran through Frank’s body, leaving his face hot and flushed, his hands clammy and cold.

Jeanine, smiling and excited hurried to him, unaware of the fear that had gripped her husband. She turned her face upwards, towards his as Frank bent his face closer to her’s. Denying the river of sweat still running down his spine, denying the anxiety that had left him literally turning around in circles, and with as much calmness in his voice as he could command, Frank asked his wife, “Where did you get to?”

Carefully, Jeanine pulled a small cloth bundle out of her bag and placing it in the palm of her hand, folded back the corners of the white cotton material, revealing three hand carved, hand painted elephants, by size clearly meant to represent a father, mother and calf. Delicate in design, swirls of colour rose from each foot, morphing into flowers, clouds and birds. Each elephant, though able to stand alone, was carved in such a way that their trunks “nested” one into the other, forming a circle, the baby elephant’s trunk nesting into the mother elephant’s trunk, which nested into the father elephant’s trunk.

A symbol of “family” that Frank knew all too well. It caught him off guard.  “They’re beautiful,” he said so softly that he wasn’t sure if he had spoken the words aloud or merely thought them.

Jeanine gently ran her finger on the carving that was the baby elephant, her eyes moist, but her voice steady. “While you were talking, a young woman brushed me as she walked by. When I turned I saw her baby in a sling on her back, a little boy. “Oh Frank, his eyes were big and dark, just like Jordan’s and he looked right at me and he smiled. And then I noticed the cloth sling had elephants printed on it and before I knew it, my feet just took me.”

Frank remembered when his feet would just take him. So full of grief and anger after Jordan died, he ran every sidewalk and trail over and over and over again. Jordan had been only six months old. The medical team did everything they could, except save him. When Frank and Jeanine started attending the infant death support group, they’d learned that elephants were a symbol for families who had lost an infant or child to death. 

That wasn’t why they had come to India – to hunt symbolic elephants. They’d came to relearn how to live in the world without him. Without Jordan, their son.

“Yes, but where did you get to?” Frank asked again. “I was a bit worried. I turned around and you were gone.” 

“I’m so sorry, Frank. I didn’t go far. The baby started to squirm on his mother’s back and she stopped to readjust him. I suddenly realized that she might think I was following her, so I turned and found myself looking in the window of that little shop over there.”

She pointed to a shop with a curtained doorway.  “The window was full of every kind of elephant decoration, jewelry, cloths, trinkets. I just stepped inside for a moment . . . and I saw these. You, me and Jordan,” she said.

“They’re beautiful,” Frank said once more. 

Jeanine refolded the cloth over the three small carvings and tucked them back into her bag.  She took Frank’s hand and squeezed it. The months since Jordan’s death had been the most difficult of Frank’s life, of both their lives, but seeing the softness in Jeanine’s face, he thought that maybe they’d be all right. He squeezed her hand in return.

“What about you?” she said.  Did you buy anything?”

“Not yet.” Frank replied. “Do you have any room left in your bag? I saw a mortar and pestle that I really like. Come, let me show you.”

Debra P. McGill is an ordained minister in the United Church of Canada serving a congregation in Cambridge. She has two adult married daughters and three brilliant grandsons. Debra loves to cycle and enjoys challenging/adventuresome holidays, summited Mt. Kilimanjaro, trekked the Dolomites and cycled the Cabot Trail.  She is a lover of words and is an advid reader, though this is her first time taking a writing course and is grateful for the opportunity to write a word painting. Thank you, Brian, for your gentle, affirming guidance.  

Join the discussion and hang out with your fellow writers on the Quick Brown Fox facebook page here

See Brian Henry’s schedule hereincluding writing workshops and creative writing courses in Algonquin Park, Bolton, Barrie, Brampton, Burlington, Caledon, Georgetown, Guelph, Hamilton, Ingersoll, Kingston, Kitchener, London, Midland, Mississauga, Oakville, Ottawa, Peterborough, St. Catharines, Saint John, NB, Sudbury, Thessalon, Toronto, Windsor, Woodstock, Halton, Kitchener-Waterloo, Muskoka, Peel, Simcoe, York Region, the GTA, Ontario and beyond.

Sunday, December 10, 2017

How to Make Yourself Write ~ A Creativity Workout, Saturday, June 9, in London

How to Make Yourself Write
A Creativity Workout
Saturday, June 9, 2018
1:00 – 4:30 p.m.
London Public Library, Tonda Room, 251 Dundas St, London, Ontario (Map here)

Let's get motivated! This workshop is designed to help you find the time and the inspiration to write. No more staring at a blank screen. Come to this workshop and give yourself a kick-start, and then learn how to keep going. This creativity workout will get your words flowing and help you make the breakthrough into the next level of writing.

Workshop leader Brian Henry has been a book editor and creative writing instructor for more than 25 years. He publishes Quick Brown Fox, Canada’s most popular blog for writers, teaches creative writing at Ryerson University, and has led workshops everywhere from Boston to Buffalo and from Sarnia to Charlottetown. But his proudest boast is that he has helped many of his students get their first book published and launch their careers as authors. 
See reviews of Brian's classes and workshops here.

Fee: 37.17 + 13% hst = 42 paid in advance by mail or Interac
or 39.82 + 13% hst = 53 if you wait to pay at the door
To reserve a spot now, email: brianhenry@sympatico.ca

See Brian’s complete current schedule hereincluding writing workshops and creative writing courses in Algonquin Park, Bolton, Barrie, Brampton, Burlington, Caledon, Georgetown, Guelph, Hamilton, Ingersoll, Kingston, Kitchener, London, Midland, Mississauga, Oakville, Ottawa, Peterborough, St. Catharines, Saint John, NB, Sudbury, Thessalon, Toronto, Windsor, Woodstock, Halton, Kitchener-Waterloo, Muskoka, Peel, Simcoe, York Region, the GTA, Ontario and beyond.

Saturday, December 9, 2017

Seventy-three Great Gifts for Writers (I've added a few)

Fingerless gloves for writing: they come
in Alice's Adventure in Wonderland,
Hamlet, The Raven, Jane Eyre...
For the seven very best gifts for writers, see here

Stocking Stuffers
A gift bag of coffee or tea and snack foods, because writers have long thought that caffeine and sugar are their best friends.
Healthy snacks, because it’s not true that sugar is your bff.
A Christmas classic: A Christmas Carol by Dickens, Christmas at Thomspon Hall by Trollope, The Night Before Christmas by Gogol, The Nutcracker by Hoffman … here
Hanukkah books for kids … herehere or here
A gift certificate to Tim Horton’s, because a comfortable cafĂ© is often the best place to write.
Fingerless gloves (type and have warm fingers). You can also get a Pride and Prejudice scarf, a Sense and Sensibility pillow cover, a Black Beauty baby blanket ... here

Reading is Sexy button … here
Timer for writing sprints
AquaNotes waterproof notepads (for shower ideas—yes, these really work!)
Pens 
A stamp with a happy face for critiquing your fellow writers 

Board Games & Creativity Helpers
Apples to Apples is a great creative game; you need to match a noun card in your hand to a given adjective card and convince the dealer that your (absurd) choice really is the best. We had a hoot playing this at the end of the day at the Algonguin Writing Retreat last June. ~Brian
Dixit may be the most popular writing board game out there. Players have to convince other players that their story card is the best way to tell the story.
With 540 cards, the Storymatic feeds the imagination. Just pull out cards from each category (such as “Obstacle” and “Whatchoowant”) and let the storytelling begin. Great for writers experiencing writer’s block and collaborative writing groups.  
Writer Emergency Pack. It includes 52 cards with fantastic illustrations and loads of ideas. Whenever you’re struggling with a story, you can pull out a card and get inspiration! (Or at least a giggle.)
The Game of Things  makes everyone write. You’re given a category like “Things that Jiggle” and everybody has to write down a funny or crazy answer. Then the leader of the round reads them anonymously and you have to guess who wrote what. If you play with the right people, it’s fun and funny.
In The Writer’s Toolbox, there are 60 games to play to inspire writers to create — be the first to create a story based on “First Sentences, Non Sequiturs, and Last Straws.” Also, use one of two spinners to generate a random detail that you have to include in your story. 
In Once Upon a Time, the leader plays cards to start a story, trying to guide the story toward his end card. Other players try to jump in and play their cards. First one to use all their cards up wins! Great fun for creative writers.
Bananagrams anagram game … here
Scrabble Magnetic Refrigerator Tiles … here
The Writer's Toolbox: Creative Games and Exercises for Inspiring the 'Write' Side of Your Brain ...here

For Writers Who Outline
Index cards
Notebooks
Corkboard &  pushpins
Whiteboard with dry erase markers and eraser

Technology Helpers
Programs like Scrivener (Windows and Mac) for organizing and word processing
Dragon Naturally Speaking (options at Amazon) for voice recognition-driven writing 
 Typing program (learn to type faster!)
Wireless/ergonomic keyboard or mouse
Virtual keyboard for mobile use

Big Ticket Items
New computer
Bigger computer monitor
eReader or eTablet (Kindle/Kindle Fire, iPad, Android tablet, etc.)
Ergonomic desk chair
Cover design or editing costs for self-published authors


Writing Craft and Publishing-Related Books
The Art of Fiction, John Gardner
The Art of War for Writers, James Scott Bell
The Artist's Way, Julia Cameron
Bird by Bird: some instructions on writing and life,  by Anne Lamott.
Conflict, Action and Suspense, William Noble
The Elements of Style, William Strunk and E.B. White
The Fiction Editor, Thomas McCormak
How Stories Work, James Woods
On Writing: a memoir of the craft, Stephen King
Spunk and Bite: A Writer's Guide to Bold Contemporary Style, Arthur Plotnik
Writing Down the Bones, Natlie Goldberg
The Thesaurus books by Angela Ackerman and Becca Puglisi (The Emotion ThesaurusThe Positive Trait Thesaurus, and The Negative Trait Thesaurus)
Save the Cat by Blake Snyder
The Power of Point of View by Alicia Rasley

Miscellaneous Suggestions
Comfort clothes (robe and fuzzy slippers, sweat pants, but be careful; you may never change out of them. See here!)
Gift basket full of writing-related ideas (pens, notebooks, special beverage and glass, inspirational items or quotes, etc.)
Gift cards for books
Gift cards for office supply stores
Subscription to music source (PandoraSpotifyGrooveshark, etc.)
Lithographs: Shirts and totes printed with images and the text of your favourite novels. Tattoos available, too … here.

Out of Print Tee’s: T-shirts, tote bags, iphone cases – all sorts of things, decorated with your favourite book covers (here).
Premium level of online service (Dropbox for automatic backups, Amazon Prime for free shipping/lending library, etc.)
Entry fee for a writing contest
Massage gift certificates, a back or foot massager
A head scratcher!
Writing time (anything from babysitting to a writers’ retreat to a housecleaning service)

But for the very best gifts for writers, see here.

Note: Don't ever miss a post on Quick Brown Fox. Fill in your email in the box to the right under my bio, and get each post delivered to your Inbox. 
Also, if you're not yet on my newsletter list, send me an email, including your locale to:  brianhenry@sympatico.ca ~ Brian

See my schedule here,  including writing workshops and creative writing courses in Algonquin Park, Bolton, Barrie, Brampton, Burlington, Caledon, Georgetown, Guelph, Hamilton, Ingersoll, Kingston, Kitchener, London, Midland, Mississauga, Oakville, Ottawa, Peterborough, St. Catharines, Saint John, NB, Sudbury, Thessalon, Toronto, Windsor, Woodstock, Halton, Kitchener-Waterloo, Muskoka, Peel, Simcoe, York Region, the GTA, Ontario and beyond.